Need help with suicide prevention campaign

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Need help with suicide prevention campaign

Postby Rapmrc » Thu Oct 27, 2011 2:54 pm

Hello All,

I am working with a group of volunteers to create a suicide prevention social marketing campaign. We are trying to target the loved ones of those who might be contemplating suicide. We have come up with five phrases to use in our campaign, and I was looking for some input. What do you think would be the most effective phrase?

1) Worried? Take action.
2) Give Hope for Tomorrow by Caring Today-Just Ask
3) Caring is Asking. Reach Out and Save a Life
4) Be the ONE to Save Someone
5) Reach Out-Care Enough To Ask

Any input is great! We just want to make sure we move forward with the phrase that can make the most difference. Thank you for your help.
Last edited by Rapmrc on Wed Nov 02, 2011 10:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Need help with suicide prevention campaign

Postby cmarie » Thu Oct 27, 2011 7:52 pm

Gotta say, none of these would have worked for me. I had no clue my son was considering the action he took. If I had a clue, I would have asked him.
I'll love you forever,
I'll like you for always.
As long as I'm living,
My baby you'll be.
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Re: Need help with suicide prevention campaign

Postby Karyl » Thu Oct 27, 2011 10:20 pm

Rapmrc,

I think this is a great idea. Publicity can make a difference in educating the public.

I'm a little confused about your proposed slogans. If I followed your note right, the slogan will be intended for suicidal people, not for those who want to help them.

So are you telling suicidal people to ask?

The slogans sound as if they are directed to other people who might know someone who might be having suicidal thoughts, but not the suicidal people themselves.

Am I mixed up, or what?

I really like this idea of slogans and hope you will find a way to make it work.
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Re: Need help with suicide prevention campaign

Postby Rapmrc » Fri Oct 28, 2011 11:27 am

Karyl,

Thanks for your input. The slogans are targeted towards the loved ones of those who may be contimplating suicide. (A wife thinks her husband is depressed and she is worried he may be contimplating suicide, so the phrases are targeted at her.) These are not for the suicidal people themselves, but for other people who care about someone they think MAY be suicidial. We are trying to open communication so people will ask and try to talk about it.
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Re: Need help with suicide prevention campaign

Postby psyquestor » Fri Oct 28, 2011 12:49 pm

While I'm behind any campaign to get information out there to help save lives, I think that some of your 'slogans' contribute to a stereotype. It looks like some are aimed at getting people to talk to the suicidal person. While I agree that's helpful, it also reinforces that stereotype that perhaps no one cared or talked to the persons who have already completed suicide. In short it leads to the "blame game" our society is so fond of. Why? They don't want to believe it could happen to them.

It CAN happen to anyone, anywhere at any time. Rich, poor, black, white, unemployed, successful career...moms, dads, sisters brothers...
Anyone.

How do we get that message out there?

Most hotlines are geared toward helping people who are having suicidal thoughts themselves; not toward those who are in their lives. I fully back this because of the obvious: the choice is really up to one person - the suicidal person. I tried to get my son help but once a person is an adult, there is precious little you can do to help them. (trust me I did everything possible). Education about what to do for your suicidal loved one is helpful too (just because it didn't help us doesn't mean it doesn't help sometimes).

Wishing you the very best in your campaign, I hope you are able to educate people on suicide prevention in a way that doesn't "blame" the survivors and reaches the loved ones in a manner that helps. I still firmly believe that getting the suicidal person to make that call is the best option for now. My own thinking is to fund a hotline for teens and adults that allows them to either chat or text. This is the communication that they are used to and it also allows them some level of 'anonymity' in the way that they don't have to physically talk to someone. I'm still working on how to make that a reality.
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Re: Need help with suicide prevention campaign

Postby Bereaved1 » Sat Oct 29, 2011 10:00 pm

Hi Rapmrc. I think with a little edit 5) Reach Out-Care Enough could target everybody including suicidal people who might be able to remember a glimmer of something to care enough about to stay alive. It might help them live through whatever feelings of shame are destroying them. It could also help the people who love them remember that everybody can make a difference.

Right now, I have a roaring rage headache about the Bank and Credit Card offers I am getting to reduce my debt significantly. I tanked after my beloved fiancé took his life in 2008. He had a lot of debt and was probably getting the degrading, threatening calls and letters I am getting now. Chase Bank's debt reduction offer looking like a lottery that I just received shows me that it's just a game with them with high APR's that people take seriously that get reduced. The tragedy is when it kills people.

I think it's very important to get the truth out there. Thank you for your commitment.

Rapmrc wrote:Hello All,

I am working with a group of volunteers to create a suicide prevention social marketing campaign. We are trying to target the loved ones of those who might be contimplating suicide. We have come up with five phrases to use in our campaign, and I was looking for some input. What do you think would be the most effective phrase?

1) Worried? Take action.
2) Give Hope for Tomorrow by Caring Today-Just Ask
3) Caring is Askin,. Reach Out and Save a Life
4) Be the ONE to Save Someone
5) Reach Out-Care Enough To Ask

Any input is great! We just want to make sure we move forward with the phrase that can make the most diffence. Thank you for your help.
"And the day came when the risk it took to remain tight inside the bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom." Anais Nin
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Re: Need help with suicide prevention campaign

Postby cali » Sun Oct 30, 2011 2:52 am

Rapmrc, I am happy for any effort to prevent suicide.

I respectfully disagree that publicly encouraging loved ones to reach out toward the suicidal lays blame at their doorstep when they are unsuccessful. We are only just barely beginning to understand how to help. But then I think blame has no place in this issue EXCEPT for negligence/carelessness, incompetence, and bullying. I also feel that many suicidal people are incapable of asking for help. My view is that suicide is not a choice but a very often fatal illness. I know many of us did everything we possibly could to help and still weren't able to. What that says to me is that we need more resources, more help, both for the suicidal and for their loved ones.

I DO agree with "targeting" the people close to the suicidal. If my son's friends knew what to do or at least had options that were publicly presented to them as acceptable courses of action, my son might still be here, because they knew about his state of mind long before I did- but I only learned that after he died. But how could I possibly hold them accountable? They didn't have a clue as to what they might do other than take it all on themselves individually, and end up feeling inadequate and falling into denial. "Friends don't let friends drink and drive" has been very successful among young people and others as well. Because of that and similar campaigns, having a designated driver is now popular and acceptable.

What if friends didn't let friends have "secret" death wishes? - Not as if that should be the actual slogan. Though on second thought... But something targeted at both the suicidal and those who care for them that would de-stigmatize talking about it. Suicide and suicidal thoughts should not be secrets. They are far too prevalent and dangerous. Another message to get out there, as bluntly as possible. PEOPLE ARE DYING.

But my main point is that we need MORE RESOURCES. To me the stated goal of your campaign needs to go further. A loving friend or family member is not enough to prevent a death from suicide. This needs to be a community issue, as far-fetched as that may sound. Someone can't be the "ONE" to save someone. It may start with one but it takes more than one.

Yes people do need to reach out and Talk, and Ask, and Listen, And take Action.

But what are those actions? This is what we all need to know.

Here are some actions off the top of my head:

Get support in supporting someone you love. You can't do it alone.

Call a crisis line, with the suicidal person, or without them, or both. Encourage the suicidal person to call a crisis line and make sure they have the # at all times. If you are supporting someone who is suicidal, YOU are in crisis too. Call and get support and ideas.

Involve professionals, but don't hand it over. Monitor the treatment plan. Stay involved. Get other opinions. Be a willing ear for how the treated person feels about it. Don't ever discount their feelings. Don't stand for being excluded by a professional when you've been asked for help and the person is still suicidal.

If you are the main source of support, how about going to joint therapy sessions, to brainstorm and learn how to effectively help the person. You may be able to hear their needs better, as well as express your own. It also let's the person you care for know that you are in this together.

Get group support. Groups are powerful and there ought to be twelve step groups for the suicidal and for those who support them. I think that 12 steps have a great format that is tried and true, and other types of support groups should be in existence
for suicidality as well.

Don't just keep it in the family. De-stigmatize, reach out to friends too. But friends need to be able to contact family, if family hasn't been contacted. And EVERYONE NEEDS EDUCATION. You cannot bully someone into staying alive, for example.

Suicide has many causes. I believe it is generally a compilation of many factors and pains that lead to an extreme narrowing of focus. Learn how to help widen the focus.

GET BLOODWORK. MANY TIMES THERE MAY BE AN UNDERLYING PHYSICAL SITUATION. Not enough B12, for example. Low sodium for another. Blood sugar issues. Thyroid, inadequate oxygen, etc. etc.

ADDRESS SLEEP ISSUES SERIOUSLY. I have read several times of people dying of suicide after severe sleep deprivation.

Address any stated addictions very seriously.
Marijuana use can be extremely dangerous to someone who is imbalanced. It is not a cure-all and it can be addictive, contrary to popular belief and it's sudden prevalence on many TV shows (is it about to go corporate?).

If physical pain is a contributing factor, learn how to resource pain management groups and techniques.

Find good sources of ONLINE support.

Bring the beauty and healing of nature and the kindness of others into the forefront. Encourage tolerance, openness and compassion for those among us who suffer.

We are only at the very beginning of learning how to help others help themselves to stay alive. Progress has been made with other diseases. Progress will be made with this one too. Thank you for doing something. Thank you so much.

I did everything I was able to save my son. It was not enough. I did not have enough help. And sometimes he desperately wanted help, and sometimes he pushed it away. The one thing I do know is that by myself and even with the help of so-called professionals, I was not enough. My son told me so, as kindly as he could. He needed more than I could provide. He knew it and I knew it, but the resources weren't there. He had already lost himself, and then I lost him too. One lifeline is not enough. A suicidal person needs several.

Hindsight being the great teacher, after all.

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Re: Need help with suicide prevention campaign

Postby Bereaved1 » Sun Oct 30, 2011 8:12 am

Thank you, Cali for your important words. People ARE trying. People are DYING.
"And the day came when the risk it took to remain tight inside the bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom." Anais Nin
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Re: Need help with suicide prevention campaign

Postby Bereaved1 » Sun Oct 30, 2011 8:23 am

I think the Institutions and Corporations that are the cause of people committing suicide should be targeted for money and help to prevent suicide. see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RT6rL2UroE&feature=fvst
"And the day came when the risk it took to remain tight inside the bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom." Anais Nin
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Re: Need help with suicide prevention campaign

Postby psyquestor » Sun Oct 30, 2011 8:34 am

Involve professionals, but don't hand it over. Monitor the treatment plan. Stay involved. Get other opinions. Be a willing ear for how the treated person feels about it. Don't ever discount their feelings. Don't stand for being excluded by a professional when you've been asked for help and the person is still suicidal


When the person is an adult the doctor will not breach confidentiality. If they decide your loved one isn't at risk, they let them go. As sad as that is, that's the way it is. Taking someone's rights from them (becoming their proxy or guardian) is not an easy task and you have to demonstrate that the person is in danger. Not always easy.

The system has FAILED many of us. We used it the way it was intended and then THEY dropped the ball. Education for medical staff is paramount.

I understand why you disagree on the blame issue and I'm happy that it was not an issue for you. It was for us, so I stand by what I've written. Also when I state that our best option for now is to reach out to the suicidal person, this is not to blame those people either. My son's judgment and thinking were clouded by his depression. Very little we said reached him. Then again, I am not a therapist trained to deal with these crisis situations. If it had been up to me, he'd still be here. Alas, it wasn't up to me. It was left up to a doctor with inadequate training and my son, who wasn't thinking straight.
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